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[CA11] SeaTalkNG to NMEA2000 Connection
12-18-19, 11:54 AM (This post was last modified: 12-18-19 02:09 PM by Chuck - Raymarine - Moderator.)
Post: #1
[CA11] SeaTalkNG to NMEA2000 Connection
We have a 2009 Sabre with twin Volvo D6-IPS450 engine drives that is new to us this year. The purpose of this post is to gain understanding of the existing 2009 vintage Raymarine system to determine whether a partial upgrade, or remove all and replace all with new is in order. It has an entire Raymarine redundant suite of navigation MFD/GPS/AIS transciever/HD Radar/S3G autopilot/DSM30 depth. The specifics are not necessary for the purpose of this post's question. And in keeping with the one question one post policy explained to me in response to previous requests I am trying to minimize the repeating of irrelevant information.

A NMEA2000 network was created for boat data display (Volvo MFD display) via appropriate Volvo NMEA2000 gateways and to interface with the autopilot. This work was conducted by Sabre.

The rest of the Raymarine suite was installed by a local Raymarine dealer in 2011 when the boat was commissioned by the first owner. The RM suite has most of the proprietary RM networks (SeaTalk, SeaTalk2, SeaTalkHS, and SeaTalkNG). This question relates to the connection of the SeaTalkNG network to the boat's NMEA2000. STNG consists of a STNG converter E22158 that converts GPS data from the RS125, and connects AIS650, the two MFDs, and to the NMEA2000 network.

The connection between NMEA2000 and STNG is done with a blue/white backbone cable that has a devicenet connector spliced on the NMEA2000 end. As part of the upgrade I want to replace this with the appropriate cable and adaptor. Both networks have their own power connections and I have been told that NMEA2000 networks should only have one power connection. Considering the original interface cable was customized (power not passed through?), will I need to disconnect one of the power supplies (NMEA or STNG?) if the original cable is replaced with adapter / cable?
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12-18-19, 02:33 PM
Post: #2
RE: [CA11] SeaTalkNG to NMEA2000 Connection
Welcome to the Raymarine Forum Hank,

Q1. The connection between NMEA2000 and STNG is done with a blue/white backbone cable that has a devicenet connector spliced on the NMEA2000 end.
A1. For clarification, Raymarine does not produce a blue/white SeaTalkng Backbone Cable. SeaTalkng Backbone Cables are blue/black and SeaTalkng Spur Cables are white/black. Much as I believed you have described a backbone which has been constructed from SeaTalkng networking components may be interfaced to a NMEA 2000 backbone which has been constructed from third party NMEA 2000 networking components. Please click here to view a FAQ addressing this subject.

Q2. As part of the upgrade I want to replace this with the appropriate cable and adaptor.
A2. Until such time as Raymarine introduces a SeaTalkng Backbone to DeviceNet Adapter Cable (hopefully in 2020), the solution specified within the FAQ referenced above should be employed.

Q3. Both networks have their own power connections and I have been told that NMEA2000 networks should only have one power connection.
A3. Correct.

Q4. Considering the original interface cable was customized (power not passed through?), will I need to disconnect one of the power supplies (NMEA or STNG?) if the original cable is replaced with adapter / cable?
A4. Yes. Any SeaTalkng Backbone to DeviceNet Adapter Cable introduced by Raymarine will likely pass all five leads of the cable from plug to plug. When the cable splice was made, it was likely that the ground and power leads of the cables were not spliced together.
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12-19-19, 11:38 AM (This post was last modified: 12-19-19 05:05 PM by Chuck - Raymarine - Moderator.)
Post: #3
RE: [CA11] SeaTalkNG to NMEA2000 Connection
Chuck, Thanks for your reply.

Black/white - My error.

That does raise a secondary question. NMEA 2000 cables seem to only be differentiated for specific use based on length where cables connecting devices ("spur" ) to the backbone can't exceed 6 meters. With STNG, are there physical differences between backbone and spur cables beside color coding? As an FYI, after chasing this stuff in less than comfortable spaces color coding for purpose alone is worth the price of admission.

Going back to my question on STNG<>NMEA2000 integration, while I have not pulled out all of the wiring it appears that there is a terminating resistor on the NMEA2000 side and one on the STNG. Is that a correct assumption, or have I overlooked something in my visual inspection? And like the power source question, would termination rules change with a conversion to a single power source?

Thanks
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12-20-19, 10:01 AM
Post: #4
RE: [CA11] SeaTalkNG to NMEA2000 Connection
Hank,

Q1. That does raise a secondary question. NMEA 2000 cables seem to only be differentiated for specific use based on length where cables connecting devices ("spur" ) to the backbone can't exceed 6 meters. With STNG, are there physical differences between backbone and spur cables beside color coding? As an FYI, after chasing this stuff in less than comfortable spaces color coding for purpose alone is worth the price of admission.
A1. I can't argue with the value of color coding in this instance. The difference between SeaTalkng Backbone Cables and SeaTalkng Spur Cables are that
- the SeaTalkng Spur Cables contain an additional lead to support SeaTalk communications with legacy SeaTalk products
- SeaTalkng spur plugs & sockets (white) differ from SeaTalkng backbone plugs & sockets (blue), preventing incorrect assembly and to aid in understanding the type of cable or component which will be connected to socket or cable.

Q2. Going back to my question on STNG<>NMEA2000 integration, while I have not pulled out all of the wiring it appears that there is a terminating resistor on the NMEA2000 side and one on the STNG. Is that a correct assumption, or have I overlooked something in my visual inspection?
Q2. There should be two termination resistors / plugs within a properly constructed backbone. These will be located at the two opposite / extreme ends of the backbone.

Q3. And like the power source question, would termination rules change with a conversion to a single power source?
A3. Negative.
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